Beer bottle labels #3

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Yep… more beer bottle labels to add to the slowly growing set!

The Punk IPA one caught my eye because of its unusual design. Wasn’t at all sure at the start that it was brewed in the UK, then I spotted a reference to Aberdeen on the cap.
Just to confirm I decided to check out their website (great website btw, decidedly different) and sure enough, its brewed in Aberdeenshire… along with a range of other bottled beers each having an… er… “unusual” label design. Haven’t spotted the rest of them locally though. Yet!

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(Click on the thumbnails for larger versions)

And as a postscript to the last post on this topic, the other day I decided to crack open the Village Bike (hmm… strikes me there’s something fundamentally wrong with that phrase!).

Mighty pleased I did, too.

Now I’m by no means a connoisseur of beer, or even a frequent beer drinker. Consequently I don’t really command the words necessary to fully describe the taste, so I won’t try. Suffice to say that I thoroughly enjoyed it. To date, and of the various beers and ales I have sampled in the past, its gotta be one of the best.

Now I wonder if there’s any more Village Bikes around?!

About fotdmike

Occasional photographer; occasional writer/blogger; occasional activist; occasional computer-geek. Bit of a fool really.
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7 Responses to Beer bottle labels #3

  1. forkboy says:

    “Post modern classic pale ale.” Someone in marketing deserves a gold star for that one!

    So the Village Bike did the trick for you, eh? Well you know what they say about the Village Bike….it’ll be ’round again soon enough.

  2. fotdmike says:

    Yeah, I have to say I rather like brewdog’s whole approach to marketing. Its sufficiently perverse “inverted” to appeal to me. I used to employ a very similar approach when I was running my graphics business and its surprising how successful it can be.

    And I’m so pleased by the thought of more of the Village Bike!

  3. The color of the background in the first picture really brings out the orange of the label. I really like the beer labels for the Punk IPA. Its really cool and new. It makes it stand out.

  4. fotdmike says:

    It certainly does that Maggie. Lined up on a shop shelf with a load of other UK-brewed bottled beers it was the Punk IPA label that really caught my eye simply because it was so different from all the rest on display.

    So to that extent it certainly works. As labels go though I can’t say its one I particularly like. If I’d been shopping for a beer simply to drink (as opposed to “label collecting”) and with my limited knowledge of beers and ales then, on the design of the packaging, I probably wouldn’t have gone for it.
    Nor is this a hypothetical situation for I’ve done precisely that a few times in the past (mainly when I’ve fancied a change from whisky!).

    Therefore, from a marketing point of view, one would need to balance the immediate visual impact of the label against what it has to say about the contents.
    Taking this a stage further, its conceivable that the label design isn’t intended to say anything very much about the content but is actually a statement consistent with the marketing approach typified by both their website and the smalltext “blurb” on the sides of the label (borne out to some extent by the naming of the product). In which case, given the name of the product, I think the colour was a bad choice.

  5. fotdmike says:

    Well, I had to drink the Pickled Partridge cos I’d already poured it into a glass for the pic. Wasn’t too bad, though I can’t see myself buying any more.
    But the Punk IPA is still in the bottle at the mo’. Think I’ll leave that one ’til I’m feeling a bit braver. If the blurb on the bottle is anything to go by it should have a bit of a kick to it!

  6. forkboy says:

    Maybe the bottle wears Kickers Boots?

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